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National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

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SLOCUM GLIDER: The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) began deploying Slocum underwater gliders in the Caribbean in June of 2016. The data collected by the gliders takes months to analyze. But scientists say the technology could significantly improve hurricane forecasting, which could ultimately save lives and property in the

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HURRICANE AWARENESS TOUR: The Hurricane Hunters toured five countries in the “Caribbean,” including Mexico and Honduras, but did not include the U.S. Virgin Islands. KEESLER AIR FORCE BASE, Miss. — Some 20,000 people attended the Caribbean Hurricane Awareness Tour hosted April 24-29, 2017 by the 53rd Weather Reconnaissance Squadron “Hurricane Hunters”

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HURRICANE HUNTER TOUR: Includes Puerto Rico and Mexico, but doesn’t include the U.S. Virgin Islands. WASHINGTON — The 2017 hurricane season is fast approaching, and NOAA and the U.S. Air Force Reserve will host a series of events, including tours aboard a hurricane hunter aircraft to help communities in Puerto

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CHRISTIANSTED — Divers in St. Croix, St. Thomas and St. John are helping monitor the diverse coral reefs offshore, giving scientists valuable data that would otherwise be expensive to collect. Healthy coral reefs help the local economy in the territory, demonstrating how important it is to tourism that they stay

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CHARLOTTE AMALIE — One of two tropical waves the National Hurricane Center continues to watch has entered the Caribbean Sea as a disorganized system, but forecasters expect the system to develop as it moves west. According to this morning’s NHC update, the fast-moving system will bring showers and thunderstorms to

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MIAMI — A tropical wave is expected to move into the eastern Caribbean Sea this weekend, bringing rain and gusty wind, the National Hurricane Center said today (July 29). Meanwhile, a second tropical wave in the Atlantic has become better organized. According to forecasters, the first wave is about 1,200 miles east of

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A dying giant clam affected by bleaching. SAN JUAN — Bad coral reef news seems to be never-ending these days. Case in point: on Monday, scientists announced that the world is in for an unprecedented third year of coral bleaching across the globe. The announcement comes courtesy of NOAA Coral

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HILTON HEAD ISLAND — Tropical Storm Bonnie, the first of the year to threaten the United States, is expected to reach the South Carolina coast on Saturday evening or early Sunday, the National Hurricane Center said after upgrading the system from a tropical depression. Bonnie, coming four days before the

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MIAMI — U.S. government forecasters expect a near-normal Atlantic hurricane season, after three relatively slow years. But they also say climate conditions that influence storm development are making it difficult to predict how many hurricanes and tropical storms will arise over the next six months. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric

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SAN JUAN — Dust from the Saharan desert is bringing needed iron and other nutrients to underwater plants in the Caribbean, but bacteria may be the first thing to prosper from that dust. The dust is causing the bacteria to bloom and also become more toxic to humans and marine

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